French University Offers Masters in Drinking, Eating and Living

5 minute read
A French University that Offers Masters in Drinking, Eating and Living

Are you looking to pursue a unique course abroad? Move over the traditional courses because now you can pursue a master’s in drinking, eating and living. The prestigious political science French school, Sciences Po Lille is offering a master’s in drinking, eating and living. Let’s explore everything you need to know about this off-beat course in detail.

Masters in Drinking, Eating and Living
Credits: Giphy

About Masters in Drinking, Eating and Living

BMV, short for ‘boire, manger, vivre’ is translated as food, drinks and living in English. The unusual course includes gastro-diplomacy, food tech, and fighting sexism in the kitchen. This also includes an essay on lifestyle, plant-based alternatives to meat, the history of farming and more. Students of Sciences Po Lille burst into laughter when this course was introduced but now classes have started with 15 students in the batch and lecturer Benoit Lengaigne teaching lessons on terrestrial foods. As per the university, 70 students applied for this course, out of which only 15 students were selected. 

Credits: Sciences Po Lille

As per the Guardian, students have received job offers from some of the “Big names in the world of French food” Students can also work as TV journalists, food reviewers etc. Students also get a chance to attend and participate in food & drink conferences. 

“We threw ourselves into this major without knowing what was in it, but it’s fascinating” -Clémence Ricart- Course Student Ambassador, Sciences Po Lille

Check Out: Study in France with Scholarships

Clémence Ricart, Course Student Ambassador said it is a master’s course that unites us around one passion: the world of gastronomy and food. Given the climate emergency, food will be at the heart of global challenges.

“BMV is neither the Michelin guide nor the boozy student common room, It’s one of the best ways to ignite 20-year-old students’ passion for changing or saving the world through their future profession.” – Lecturer Benôit Lengaigne, a former director of the school who was raised in a family of wine merchants in Boulogne-sur-mer. 

Importance of the Course

According to the university website, the Drinking, Eating, Living (BMV) major is “a course that crosses the boundaries of culture, environment, and international relations” in which food is handled as a social and global issue.

In France, food and drink are treated very seriously. Emmanuel Macron, the French president, designated 2021 the “Year of French Gastronomy.” Even yet, students were amused by the inauguration of the BMV course, according to lecturer Benôit Lengaigne.

However, food is an important topic due to the current climate emergency, and this first-ever such course in the globe intends to prepare students for future food shortages and related challenges.

Objectives of Training

According to the university’s official website, the Drink, Eat, Live (BMV) major’s goal is to train in:

  • Professions in the culinary arts (catering, hotel industry)
  • Tourism trades tie agriculture and wine production.
  • Animated cultural places related to food or cuisine.
  • Organizations, associations, foundations, unions, institutes, international institutions, research organizations, and competitiveness clusters are all areas of expertise.
  • Journalism and expert opinions
  • Management positions in the wine, food, and para-food industries
  • Non-engineering roles in the agro-food industry
  • Professions in food product and distribution innovation (FoodTech)

What and How Will You Learn?

According to the official website, the instruction in this course mixes social scientific perspectives (law, economics, history, political science, sociology, and so on) and promotes conversation with biological sciences.

Through cultural identities and the comparative elements given by the international viewpoint, the Major or MA course focuses on innovative ways of producing, consuming, storing, and sharing foods.

Students attend food and beverage conferences in addition to completing essays on lifestyle, plant-based alternatives to meat, farming history, and other themes.

Students, for example, dress up as TV journalists, restaurant critics, and meal delivery company executives to quiz one another on quality and working conditions.

Lengaigne states that, while introducing students to various food and drink conferences and events is part of the course, the course largely focuses on helping students address social and political issues associated with food.

According to The Telegraph, the school includes classes on ‘terrestrial foods,’ ‘gastro-diplomacy,’ confronting sexism and harassment in hospitality, and culinary tech.

According to the course page on Science Po Lille’s website, there is also an entrepreneurial side to the Master’s for students who want to enter the food tech field, who can receive extra help for projects centred in this sector.

During the course, students can also do a work placement in the food and beverage industry.

How Will You Get a Job?

The final question is how successfully the degree translates into employment.

“It’s one of the best ways to ignite 20-year-old students’ passion for changing or saving the world through their future profession,” Lengaigne said, adding that he sees students moving on to a range of industries addressed in the curriculum, such as tourism, wine, or entrepreneurial activities.

One unnamed first-year student expressed concern that “future employers would laugh when they saw the heading ‘drink, eat, live’ on our CV.” However, based on first business feedback, we are certain that it will work.”

FAQs

Q1. What are the objectives of the BMV Course?

Ans. Some of the major objectives of the BMV course includes:
Professions in the culinary arts (catering, hotel industry)
Tourism trades tie agriculture and wine production.
Animated cultural places related to food or cuisine.

Q2. What will the students learn in the course?

Ans. Lengaigne states that, while introducing students to various food and drink conferences and events is part of the course, the course largely focuses on helping students address social and political issues associated with food.

Q3. How is the course important for the future?

Ans. According to the university website, the Drinking, Eating, Living (BMV) major handles food as a social and global issue, crossing the boundaries of culture, environment, and international relations.

Related Reads:

Study in Paris: 1 Year with this Dual Masters Program Top Public Universities in France for International Students
Best Universities in France 2024 You Should Know About How to Make a Sure-Shot Career in Political Science
The Emile Boutmy Scholarship to Study in Paris Best Student Cities in the World 2023

This was all about a Master’s in Eating, Drinking and Living from the prestigious French school- Sciences Po Lille. Are you planning to study in France? Contact our Leverage Edu experts at 1800 57 2000 for end-to-end assistance from application to Visa process. 

Leave a Reply

Required fields are marked *

*

*

2 comments
    1. Hello,

      Sciences Po Lille, one of the most prestigious political science colleges in France, offers this course.

    1. Hello,

      Sciences Po Lille, one of the most prestigious political science colleges in France, offers this course.