Syllogism Questions

Syllogism Questions

Syllogism use the magic of deductive reasoning to come up with conclusions from multiple propositions. Competitive exams have an essential section where you will be solving syllogism questions in a limited time. Even if you are a wordsmith, syllogism can be a complex and perplexing section to comprehend. Practicing consistently is the key to cracking these questions because it will help you in grasping the inherent concept of syllogism. So, in this blog we will be listing major syllogism questions for competitive exams along with the tricks and hacks you can utilize to crack this section successfully.

Common Syllogism Questions for Competitive Exams

For a syllogism question, there are two core features: two or more statements with two or more conclusions. With the increasing level of difficulty in terms of statements, the following are the most common syllogism questions for competitive exams: 

Example 1 of  Syllogism Questions

There are two statements in the following question after which there are two conclusions i.e. 1 and 2. You have to assume that the two statements are true and then choose the conclusion (s) that logically follows these statements, regardless of whether they are commonly known statements.

Statements:

  1. Some birds are reptiles.
  2. Some insects are reptiles.

Conclusions:

  1. All insects being reptiles is a possibility.
  2. Some reptiles are birds.

Choose the conclusion(s) that follows the above statements.

  1. Only conclusion 1
  2. Only conclusion 2
  3. Neither conclusion 1 nor 2
  4. Both 1 and 2

Answer: D

Explanation: The first statement explains that there are some birds which are also reptiles and the second one says that there are some insects that are reptiles. So, this leads us to the possibility of some birds also being reptiles and since some reptiles are birds it can also be inferred by reversing the Ist statement that there are some reptiles that are birds.

Example 2 of  Syllogism Questions

There are three statements in the following question after which there are three conclusions, i.e. 1, 2 and 3. You have to assume that the three statements are true regardless of whether they are commonly known statements or not and then choose the conclusion (s) that logically follows these statements.

Statements:

  1. Some bottles are cups.
  2. All cups are glasses.
  3. All glasses are saucers.

Conclusions:

  1. Some bottles are glasses.
  2. Some glasses are bottles.
  3. All cups are saucers.

Choose the conclusion(s) that follows the above statements.

  1. All
  2. Only 1, 3
  3. Only 1, 2  
  4. None of these
  5. Only 2, 3

Answer: A

Explanation:

Example 3 of  Syllogism Questions

There are four statements in the following question after which there are three conclusions, i.e. 1, 2, 3 and 4. You have to assume that the four statements are true regardless of whether they are commonly known statements or not and then choose the conclusion (s) that logically follows these statements.

Statements:

  1. Some orange is yellow.
  2. Some yellow are green.
  3. All green is blue.
  4. No blue is black

Conclusions:

  1. No black is green.
  2. Some yellow is blue.
  3. Some black is orange.
  4. No black is orange.

Choose the conclusion(s) that following the statements.

  1. Only 1 and 2
  2. Only either 3 or 4
  3. 1 and 2 and either 3 or 4
  4. None of these
  5. Only 1 and either 3 or 4

Answer: A

Explanation: No black is green and some yellow are blue.

Syllogism Questions: Helpful Tricks & Techniques

Syllogisms test your deductive reasoning and there are some tricks that will allow you to simplify statements and conclusions. The core technique lies in connecting one statement with another and verifying the statements mentioned in the conclusion. Listed below are some helpful tricks and techniques for solving syllogism questions for competitive exams:

  • Create Venn diagrams to easily segregate one statement from another.
  • Explore all the possibilities in statements that include ‘all’ and ‘no’. If there is a statement that says “All white is black. Some pink is white.” This statement is filled with possibilities that some pink can be black or some black can be white. In questions like these you need to consider all these possibilities before coming to conclusions.
  • Questions with “some” and “all” can be confusing. Try understanding the difference that if some A is B, it doesn’t mean that all A is B or all B is A. If all C is D, it doesn’t imply that all D is C.
  • Remember to solve a syllogism problem in a sequential manner. If you directly assume the third statement after the first it will result in causing confusion because you missed out on the second statement which might be the connection between the first and the third statement.
  • Find a common relationship between statements and conclusions. A major aspect of syllogism questions in competitive exams is that they always create a connection between one statement and another. Start with reading every statement carefully and then building a common relationship to locate the right conclusions.

Thus, facts don’t exist in the world of syllogism but deductive reasoning does. The faster you begin grasping the conclusive quality of these questions you will be nailing syllogism questions for competitive exams. Seeking admission in colleges abroad can seem daunting, you don’t need to take that stress by yourself. Let the experts at Leverage Edu help you in acing your exams and finding a place in the hallways of your dream college.

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