What is Blue Revolution?

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Blue Revolution

In the period 1985 to 1990, the Indian government took an initiative named the Blue Revolution to enhance the growth of the aquaculture industry. Prior to this, it was China that used to hold 2/3rd of the entire production of aquaculture across the globe. After the launch of this successful scheme, India experienced fast-paced growth in the sector with an average rate of 9% a year. The main vision of the Blue Revolution was to generate a better economy and strive for prosperity in biosecurity and sustainability. But do you know what led to the massive growth of India in this aquaculture? Let us go through this blog and unravel what were the major steps taken by the country.

Blue Revolution in India 

YouTube: Rajya Sabha TV

Also known as Neel Kranti Mission, the Blue Revolution in India was launched around 1985 by Dr Arun Krishnsan and Dr Hiralal Chaudhari, who are also known as the fathers of the Blue Revolution. During the launch of the seventh five-year plan in 1985 – 1990, under the sponsorship of the fish farmers Development Agency (FFDA), the Blue Revolution was launched by the central government. In addition to this endeavour, in the year 1992 to 97, whilst the launch of eighth five-year plan, the intensive Marine fisheries program was launched that led to the establishment of fishing harbours in cities like Kochi, Porbandar, Port Blair, Visakhapatnam, Tuticorin, etc. 

Around that time, many related schemes were already going on in the country, thus, the Ministry of Agriculture and Farmers Welfare in collaboration with the department of animal husbandry dairying and fisheries decided to reconstruct the scheme and clubbed all the ventures under the term ‘ Blue Revolution’. Controlled by the National Fisheries Development Board (NFDB), the new plan was focused on the overall management and development of fisheries. Here are some of the main factors of Blue Revolution- 

  • Empowering the database and geographical information system of the fisheries sector 
  • National fisheries development board and its activities 
  • National scheme of welfare of fishermen 
  • Development of marine fisheries, Post Harvest Operations and Infrastructure 
  • Institutional arrangements for the fisheries sector 
  • Development of aquaculture and inland fisheries 
  • Controlling, monitoring and surveillance along with other need-based interventions 

Must Include: Important NCERT Books For UPSC Exams

Challenges Faced by India’s Fisheries Sector

In our discussion of what is Blue Revolution and its features, consequences and objectives; it is essential to primarily study the problems that were pertinent prior to the launch of this scheme. Here are some means challenges that were faced by Indian fisheries sector- 

  • Degraded quality of resources used 
  • Stagnation in the growth of marine fisheries 
  • Limited rights over the water bodies 
  • Illegal poaching of fish 
  • Seeds and medicines were available in limited stocks
  • Save water bodies were used for multiple purposes leading to infertility of water 

Also Read: What is Green Revolution?

Features of Blue Revolution

YouTube: Science Explored

Now that we are familiar with the basic structure of Blue Revolution as well as the problems that were pertinent at that time, let us have a look at some of the salient features of the scheme which were aimed towards eradicating those problems and enhancing aquaculture- 

  • Providing a suitable platform for the convergence of programs like ‘Sagarmala Project’ of Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme, National Rural Livelihoods Mission, Ministry of Shipping, Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana, etc 
  • The scheme avails various jobs in fishing and thus tries to encourage the sections to live scheduled Tribes scheduled castes women, etc 
  • Predominantly, enhancing the productivity of aquaculture and fisheries with respect to marine and inland sources was one of the major aims of Blue Revolution 
  • Various entrepreneurship developments were also promoted by the Blue Revolution scheme in private investments, public private partnership along with financial institutions. 

Also Read: What is the Black Revolution?

Objectives of Blue Revolution

Blue Revolution targeted the augmentation of aquaculture so that it can enhance the economic condition of India and also contribute towards the food and nutritional security. Along with this, the mission emphasized sustainable utilisation of water resources for the development of fisheries. Here are some objectives of the scheme- 

  • Tripling the production of fisheries in India inland as well as the marine sector by the year 2020 
  • Advancement of the fisheries into a modern industry by incorporating the use of new technologies and mechanism 
  • To enhance the income of fisher and fish farmers by encouraging active participation 
  • Ensuring food and nutritional security in the nation 
  • By using e-commerce, technologies and various other innovations; enhancing the income of fishers 

Also Read: What is Golden Revolution?

Outcomes of Blue Revolution in India 

With the success of the Blue Revolution, a major improvement was seen in the aquaculture and fisheries sector. Here are some of the outcomes that were seen with the use of marketing, fish breeding and rearing- 

  • The annual growth of 14.8% was recorded as compared to the global average of 75% across the fish products
  • From 60,000 tonnes, the Indian Fisheries Sector grew to 4.7 million tonnes of fishes including 1.6 million tonnes of fish from freshwater. 
  • Fishery became India’s largest export with the growth rate of 6% to 10%
  • Contribution of 1% and 5% to India’s GDP and Agricultural GDP respectively

Books on Blue Revolution in India

Must Read: Impact and Objectives of Grey Revolution in India

Questions and Answers for UPSC

What is Blue-Revolution?

Blue Revolution also called Neel Kranti Mission, in India was launched around 1985 by Dr Arun Krishnsan and Dr Hiralal Chaudhari. They are also known as the fathers of the Blue Revolution. Its main objective was to enhance the production of fish, marine products and introduce technological improvements in fishery and aquaculture in India.

Who is the Father of the Blue revolution?

Dr Arun Krishnsan and Dr Hiralal Chaudhari spearheaded the blue revolution in India.

What are the schemes under Blue Revolution?

National Fisheries Development Board (NFDB) and its activities
Strengthening of Database & Geographical Information System of the Fisheries SectorDevelopment of Inland Fisheries and Aquaculture
National Scheme of Welfare of Fishermen
Development of Marine Fisheries, Infrastructure and Post-Harvest Operations
Monitoring, Control and Surveillance (MCS) and other need-based Interventions
Institutional Arrangement for Fisheries Sector

What are the effects of the blue revolution?

Blue revolution has led to an annual growth of 14.8% was recorded as compared to the global average of 75% across the fish products
From 60,000 tonnes, the Indian Fisheries Sector grew to 4.7 million tonnes of fishes including 1.6 million tonnes of fish from freshwater.
Fishery became India’s largest export with a growth rate of 6% to 10%
Contribution of 1% and 5% to India’s GDP and Agricultural GDP respectively

That was all about the Blue Revolution in India. If you are looking for a unique course in aquaculture and struggling to find a suitable one then get in touch with our experts at Leverage Edu and get guidance in choosing the right program. Sign up for an e-meeting with us!

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