Subject vs Predicate

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Subject vs Predicate

Every day, we all write something, whether it’s a text message, a report, or an email. As a result, we all create sentences that are made up of various components. There are various pieces of sentences, to be sure. What’s more, guess what? Learning the names of the different sections of a sentence will show a grasp of the language and your English vocabulary. In this blog, we will study subject vs predicate along with some fun practice questions. So if you want to ace the subject vs predicate section in your English school exams or need to polish it again after school, then don’t forget to read this blog till the very end and to practice with us.

Subject vs Predicate

By the time children reach elementary school, they learn about the various parts of a sentence. These parts give a role to each term. A subject and a predicate are required for any complete sentence. But what are they, exactly? What is subject vs predicate? Let’s have a look.

Subject

The subject of a sentence is who or what performs the action denoted by the verb; in other words, the subject tells us who or what performs the action denoted by the verb. To find the subject, look for the sentence’s main verb first, then ask the question “who” or “what.” 

For example, 

The children are playing cricket

  • “Children” is the subject in the sentence.

Shruti is reading a book

  • “Shruti” is the subject in the sentence.

Predicate

The subject’s behavior is indicated by the predicate. The predicate’s main verb is the most important element. Predicates must always have a verb. They do, however, contain a couple of other components. The verb, direct object, and all other clauses or phrases are examples of these components.

For example, 

The children are playing cricket

  • “Playing Cricket” is the predicate in the sentence.

Shruti is reading a book.

  • “reading a book” is the predicate in the sentence.

Subject vs Predicate: Types of Subjects & Predicates

Till now, we have understood the basic difference between subject vs predicate. Now, let us see the classification of them:

Types of Subjects

Simple Subject

For example, 

Radhika was going to the hospital.

  • “Radhika” is a simple subject.

Complete Subject

For example, 

This yellow book has 300 pages.

  • “Yellow Book” is the completed subject as it gives a complete introduction to the subject.

Compounded Subject

For example, 

Dushyant and Priyanshu are coming to meet us.

  • “Dushyant and Priyanshu” are an example of the compound subject.

Types of Predicates

Simple Predicate

For example,

This yellow book has 300 pages.

  • “300 pages” is an example of the Simple Predicate.

Complete Predicate

For example,

Harsh always quarrel over little things.

  • “Quarrel over little things” is the complete predicate here.

Compounded Predicate

For example,

Anju likes white chocolates, but hates dark chocolates.

  • “Likes white chocolates but hates dark chocolates” is an example of Compounded Predicate.

Subject Vs Predicate: Let’s Practice 

Now after all that theory on a subject vs predicate, let us now actually see how the theory can be applied into practice. Here, we have given you some questions on a subject vs predicate to practice.

Questions 

  • The moon was looking graceful.
  • The dogs were barking fiercely.
  • The pretty girl was wearing a yellow frock.
  • My elder brother serves in the army.
  • Cherin and Natasha are working in their garden.
  • My mother and my uncle are trained, classical dancers.
  • You don’t have to wait for me.
  • We can not wait for more trouble.
  • The little tree was covered with green leaves.
  • A kind merchant was passing by the shoemaker’s window.

Answers

  • The moon (subject) was looking graceful (predicate)
  • The dogs (subject) were barking fiercely (predicate)
  • The pretty girl (subject) was wearing a yellow frock (predicate)
  • My elder brother (subject) serves in the army (predicate)
  • Cherin and Natasha (subject) are working in their garden (predicate)
  • My mother and my uncle (subject) are trained, classical dancers (predicate)
  • You (subject) don’t have to wait for me (predicate)
  • We (subject) can not wait for more trouble (predicate)
  • The little tree (subject) was covered with green leaves (predicate)
  • A kind merchant (subject) was passing by the shoemaker’s window (predicate)

Candidates taking different government exams can be asked questions based on the subject vs predicate in the general English section. We hope we were able to clear your doubts on a subject vs predicate. It was a super fun and learning exercise. Wasn’t it? If yes, then for more educational content, stay connected with Leverage Edu. You can also follow us on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Subscribe to our newsletter for more updates. 

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