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Break a Leg Meaning, Synonyms, Usage with Examples

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‘Break a leg’ is an English language idiom that means to wish someone good luck before they go on the stage to give a performance. ‘Break a Leg’ is commonly used in the performing arts, especially in theatre. 

Although this idiom has a negative interpretation, it is used as a superstition or a theatrical tradition. According to theories, this phrase was used for the first time by actors who believed that wishing someone good luck before their performance would cheer them up and encourage them to perform better.

Usage With Example

The usage of ‘Break a Leg’ is limited to the activities related to performances, especially in arts and theatre. Break a leg is an ironic or non-literal saying. Here’s an example of this idiom, ‘Don’t panic, you got this. Now go and break a leg.’

Here’s a list of examples of the ‘Break a Leg’ idiom which will give you an idea about how and when to use it.

  • ‘The entire group said break a leg to each other before their final performance.’
  • ‘I told my cousin to break a leg before he entered the examination hall.’
  • ‘The music teacher wished the entire class to break a leg before the annual day performance.’

Also read – Beating Around the Bush Meaning, Examples, Synonyms

Break a Leg Synonyms and Similar Words

There are various synonyms and similar words to the idiom ‘Break a Leg. Here’s a list of some of the most common similar words and synonyms to the phrase ‘Break a Leg’.

  • Good luck
  • All the best
  • Godspeed
  • Better luck next time
  • Go nail it

Also read – In For a Penny, In For a Pound Meaning, Examples, Synonyms

Break a Leg Meaning Quiz

My mother said ‘Break a Leg’ to me before my audition:

  1. I was very nervous
  2. There were a lot of people on the stage
  3. I was busy

Ans. I was very nervous.

Also read – Hit the Sack Meaning, Examples, Synonyms

This was all about the idiom break a leg meaning and examples. Hope you understood the concept where it’s used. For more such blogs, follow Leverage Edu.

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